Etiquette

Warm Up

Before the start of a run, a brief warm up is suggested. This is a good time to introduce yourself to fellow runners, and prepare for the route. Generally, the run leader will describe the route and identify the leaders and sweepers for the group so that everyone knows who to follow. Once the run starts, use the first few minutes to warm up, and settle into a pace for the run. It is in the interest of everyone’s safety to use the first little bit of the run to get organized settle into smaller pace groups.

Do not run through red lights and stop signs

Please consider the safety of your fellow runners and do not enter an intersection that your pace group cannot safely pass through. Come to a stop at all stop signs and red lights and only when it is safe for the group to enter the intersection should the group then proceed. Remember that it is a group ride and not a race, accept that traffic will often be a factor.

Treat other road users with the respect you would like in return

Please try to remember at all times on the road or path, that you are representing all runners every time you are on the road or path. It unfortunately only takes one bad encounter with a runner for other road and path users to assume a negative opinion of everyone who runs. Treat people with respect and courtesy and do your part to convey a positive image of our sport, to everyone. That being said, please run as close to the left side of the road as safety allows.

Respect All Paces

Just because you can run a 5:30 minute mile does not mean that you have the right to be rude or arrogant to someone that is struggling to run a 15 minute mile. Every runner has to start somewhere, and they have earned the right to respect by setting foot into the group. As the group heads out, the stronger and more experienced runners need to keep in mind the slower and less experienced runners. This includes noting hazards, providing support, and in general building up the group, not tearing it down. The day will come when you too may need that support. Earn it by giving it.

Choose your appropriate group

Group runs are rarely broken down by pace groups, but are instead set out at distances. The pace groups then form naturally as the runs go out. Do not be afraid to drop back to another group if you are struggling to hold a pace, this is not a race, you want to finish this strong, not start fast and suffer the last half. Each time you run, you will get stronger if you work at a pace that is not going to get you injured.

The Takeaway

The most important thing to remember when running in a group is to use common sense and courtesy. Do not be ‘that guy or girl’ that makes a group run unpleasant for those around them.

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